Skillset New Zealand Blog

Ideas to help your team develop personally and professionally.

So you want to lose weight, buy a yacht, or retire young and in good health?.

Imagining success helps, but it isn't enough. Positivity and optimism help too, but  probably not enough to get you through the inevitable setbacks. 

Here's my summary of the best evidence available - from researchers who have tested various techniques on large numbers of goal-strivers.

  1. Write a specific goal  Base it on the SMART acronym (but remembering that SMART is only a start).
  2. Decide the purpose of that goal so that you can keep reminding yourself of it: "I want to lose weight so that I can play sport/have fun with the kids...'
  3. Write mini-goals so that when you achieve them you will know you are on your way to achieving your ultimate goal
  4. Tie the behaviours you want to inevitable events (more).
  5. Stay realistically optimistic, generally positive, but accepting that setbacks are part of the challenge.
  6. Plan what you will do if you encounter a setback or obstacle to your goal.
  7. Review your progress regularly and write the results. Ideally, tell other people about your progress.
  8. If you are not making enough progress, brainstorm behaviours that will be more productive.
  9. Forgive lapses and get yourself back on track asap.

Recognise some things you are doing already? Good, but 'I knew that' is also a trap. What really matters is whether we are making the most of those ideas - using every one that's relevant to us.

Let's be realistic. Achieving goals is hard, unless the goals are so easy they're just a 'to do' list. Most people give up within a few weeks. People whose goal is to change entrenched behaviours, such as smoking, usually need several attempts.

We improve our chances if we see achieving goals as a process, not an exam that we pass or fail. Use the list to stay focused.

 

Interested in a workshop on achieving goals for your team? Contact us. We'll put you in touch with a trainer, not a salesperson.

 

 

Choosing to be courageous liberates us to achieve more.

Courage should be an everyday event - not necessarily worthy of a bravery award, or even something others would notice. It may be something personal to you.

Example?

I'm sometimes down at our local country school for an hour on Fridays, to help with writing and speaking skills. One week I was working with a nine-year old lad who had been 'volunteered' for the district's public speaking competiton. There would be competitors from several schools and an audience of about 100. He was speaking so quietly that only the front row could have heard him. His teacher asked if I could help him project a bit more. 

But there was a more important barrier to success: He didn't want to do it. He was telling his teacher that he wouldn't be able to go. I was sure he was terrified.

The next week, he rushed up to me. 'I did it! I went in the competition!'

Did he win? I didn't ask, because that would have masked his real achievement. He had felt the fear and done it anyway. That's courage. That's success and a foundation for more risks and more success.

In business, courage is facing up to challenging conversations with colleagues, a supplier or client.

It's developing a new product or service and seeing how it goes.

Courage is applying for promotion or quitting our current career for something more challenging.

It's willingly taking on a new project or enrolling in a study course, knowing that we could fail.

It's taking the intiative at parties or networking events - introducing ourselves and starting conversations.

It's saying, 'I'll do that' when your team needs someone to speak at a public meeting or to the media.

With courage, we take more opportunitiies. We fail more often, but overall, the result is more resilience, more success, more confidence - and a more satisfying and even longer life.

 

More about choices

Interested in a workshop to help your team thrive at work. Contact us This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

About Ralph Brown

ralph brown blog3

Ralph is our founder and managing director. He has a background in psychology, television journalism and business.

Ralph's passions are psychology and writing. He leads workshops on both and speaks to conferences on the psychology of thriving at work.

In 2011  Professional Speakers Australia awarded him its top speaking accreditation, the CSP.

He has written six books and more than a hundred articles on psychology and writing. International research journals have published his articles reviewing the research on resilience.

Ralph enjoys trips to France. He lives in rural Canterbury.

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